Overseas Expansion Opportunity

Posted: December 12, 2014 in Uncategorized
Barcelona View

Barcelona View

CEO of The Distinctive Edge, Eric, was recently in Barcelona pursuing client leads in the telecommunications industry.  Since the opening of The Distinctive Edge, overseas expansion has been a goal.  Now that we have over 24 affiliates across the nation, we are looking to continue to expand overseas.

While in Barcelona, Eric and a small team were able to visit with the client, look at office space, find flats for living, and see the city.

Eric says, “We are extremely excited about pursuing opportunities for overseas expansion.  This is just the start.  We are looking forward to using our business model to service clients all over the world.”

Stay tuned for more details and information about the expansion to come in early 2015.

To learn more about The Distinctive Edge, visit us online.  View our company culture on Facebook.

Giving back is a huge part of the culture at The Distinctive Edge.  Recently, manager Caitlin, had the opportunity to go to Guatemala to help aid in a mission for Operation Smile.  Operation Smile is an international children’s medical charity that performs safe, effective cleft lip and cleft palate surgery.

2014-11-07 10.14.18

While in Guatemala, Caitlin had the opportunity to help many.  Her responsibilities included screening and health evaluation, team building, and helping the children.  She was there for 5 days and her main mission was to help the children and their families remain calm and happy.  “Children process and normalize their surroundings through playing; therefore my job was to be great at it.  I became a bubble blowing expert, a coloring fanatic, and a hair braiding, car racing specialist,” says Caitlin.  “It is amazing how a smile and hug sends the same message of love in every culture.  Everyone wants to feel secure and safe; being apart of helping these children and families through this process was really special. It was a lesson in gratitude. I gained more from helping others than I feel like I will ever be able to give.  I know more that ever have an unrelenting need to do more.  I’m excited to see all that our organization accomplishes in the future, because this feeling in contagious!”

The Distinctive Edge has committed to having the entire organization raise $150,000 in the next year to sponsor yet another mission on its own.  The team is so proud of Caitlin and all she has done to help further our aid worldwide!

To learn more about the philanthropy projects that The Distinctive Edge is involved in, visit us online.

Each year the distinctive edge orlandoThe Distinctive Edge attends the Annual Awards Conference.  This year, the team headed to sunny Orlando to learn, network, and be recognized for a great year.

Top Account Representatives and Recruiters were selected to attend.  While there, the team was not only able to site see, but able to meet and network with some of the companies top performers.  While in meetings, the team learned about leadership development, advanced sales and marketing skills, talent acquisition, team building, scheduling, fiances, and more!

During the evening awards banquet, Kaitlyn was awarded not one, but two, pieces of Tiffany’s jewelry for hard work this year.  Kaitlyn has helped to grow the company tremendously over the past 2 years and is still continuing to advance.  Not only is Kaitlyn continuing to grow in her role, she has helped several others with promotions as well.  The entire organization did well, picking up awards for their hard work, growth, and continuing to exceed client expectations.

The organization has big goals to continue to deliver results and expand across the nation.

The Distinctive Edge’s next meeting will be held here in Baltimore this November.

To learn more about The Distinctive Edge, view us on Linkedin.  

TIMONIUM, Md. — In 2013, The Distinctive Edge expanded into 5 new locations throughout the U.S. The Distinctive Edge also more than doubled our weekly revenue from this time last year. In addition to that,
The Distinctive Edge has created countless new positions in the workforce in the Baltimore area and across the country.

Let’s take a look at what 2013 looked like for The Distinctive Edge.

February:
– Our organization took home several awards for top performance
– The Distinctive Edge’s first charity event of the year for Operation Smile; Mud Football


April:
– The Distinctive Edge got a new space to accommodate our continued growth and expansion
June:
– Organizational weekend in Annapolis, Md. The trip included all of our managers and top performers to attend training sessions at the Westin, Annapolis, attend the nationals game, and dinner at McGarveys
downtown

- The Distinctive Edge also sponsored our 2nd charity event for Operation Smile, hosting a basketball tournament at Brick Bodies Fitness Center
July:
– President Eric Chapman was featured in Baltimore’s SmartCEO magazine
– The Distinctive Edge started the monthly featured employee blog for our top performers
August:
– Leadership Conferences in Pittsburgh, Phoenix, New Orleans, and Seattle
– Recruiters Kaitlyn and Pam take home Tiffany necklaces for outstanding performance
September:
– Lucas was promoted to Assistant Management
– Rest and Relax weekend at The Grand Resort in Phoenix, AZ.
October:
– The Distinctive Edge exceeds our $5,000 goal for Operation Smile with our final charity event for the year
November:
– Leadership conference in Baltimore, MD at the Hyatt Regency
December:
– The Distinctive Edge was named a Top Workplace by The Baltimore Sun for the 2nd year in a row

- President, Eric Chapman received a special leadership award from The Baltimore Sun
– Annual Holiday Party at CVP’s


About: The Distinctive Edge is a sales and marketing firm in the Baltimore area. As a leader in the industry, The Distinctive Edge continues to have high standards when it comes to customer acquisitions, retention, and brand management. Continually adapting to change and the economy, we find our clients customers that stick. The Distinctive Edge also gives back to the community. The biggest charity that they support is Operation Smile. Each $240 raised helps one child in need of the life changing surgery and to give them back their smile.
View online at www.thedistinctive.org

Press Release

IMG_20131205_182627_751  IMG_20131205_193332_213 IMG_20131205_183502_269

On Thursday, December 5th, 2 representatives and our HR manager attended the awards ceremony where The Baltimore Sun named The Distinctive Edge the No. 2 Top Company in Baltimore to work for 2013.  This is our 2nd year as a Top Workplace and we are excited to announce that this year, President Eric Chapman, also brought home a leadership in Small Business award as well.  What a great accomplishment!

Click here to check out the article in The Baltimore Sun

The Distinctive Edge strives to be the best company, not only for our employees, but in the community as well.  We take care of our customers and our neighborhood.  Our employees enjoy our laid back, yet professional, environment, while being able to do good in the area.  We support local small businesses and charities in the area.  Our largest contribution this year is for Operation Smile.  We have exceeded our $5,000 goal due to the time spent fundraising with our co-workers, friends, and family.

This award shows that our hard work and dedication to teamwork is paying off!  A great way to end 2013 and big things to come in 2014 as we plan to expand into multiple new cities across the country! IMG_20131205_193956_866IMG_20131205_194123_845

If you’re finding it more challenging than ever to juggle the demands of your job and the rest of your life, you’re not alone.  Everyone is looking for a work/life balance.

Many people are putting in extra hours, or using their smartphones to be on call when they’re not physically at work.

“A lot of people are having a more difficult time finding balance in their lives because there have been cutbacks or layoffs where they work. They’re afraid it may happen to them, so they’re putting in more hours,” says psychologist Robert Brooks, PhD, co-author of The Power of Resilience: Achieving Balance, Confidence, and Personal Strength in Your Life.

“But even if you don’t have much control over the hours you have to work, you can ask yourself: In what other ways am I bringing greater enjoyment into my life?” Brooks says. “Focus your time and attention on things you can control.”

Here are five ways to bring a little more balance to your daily routine:

1. Build downtime into your schedule.

When you plan your week, make it a point to schedule time with your family and friends, and activities that help you recharge.

If a date night with your spouse or a softball game with friends is on your calendar, you’ll have something to look forward to and an extra incentive to manage your time well so you don’t have to cancel.

“It helps to be proactive about scheduling,” says Laura Stack, a productivity expert in Denver and author ofSuperCompetent: The Six Keys to Perform at Your Productive Best. “When I go out with my girlfriends, we all whip out our cell phones and put another girls’ night out on the calendar for 1 month later.”

Stack also plans an activity with her family, like going to a movie or the park, every Sunday afternoon. “We do this because if there’s nothing on the schedule, time tends to get frittered away and the weekend may end without us spending quality time together,” she says.

Michael Neithardt, an actor and television commercial producer in New York City, wakes up 3 hours before he has to leave for work so he can go for a run and spend some time with his wife and baby.

“A lot of my friends tend to wake up, shower, and go straight to work. And they often complain about having no time to do anything,” he says. “I find that if I can get those 3 hours in the morning, I have a more productive and peaceful workday. I can sure tell the difference when I don’t.”

2. Drop activities that sap your time or energy.

“Many people waste their time on activities or people that add no value — for example, spending too much time at work with a colleague who is constantly venting and gossiping,” says Marilyn Puder-York, PhD, a psychologist and executive coach in New York and Connecticut.

Her advice: Take stock of activities that don’t enhance your career or personal life, and minimize the time you spend on them.

You may even be able to leave work earlier if you make a conscious effort to limit the time you spend on the web and social media sites, making personal calls, or checking your bank balance. “We often get sucked into these habits that are making us much less efficient without realizing it,” Stack says.

3. Rethink your errands.

Consider whether you can outsource any of your time-consuming household chores or errands.

Could you order your groceries online and have them delivered? Hire a kid down the street to mow your lawn? Have your dry cleaning picked up and dropped off at your home or office? Order your stamps online so you don’t have to go to the post office? Even if you’re on a tight budget, you may discover that the time you’ll save will make it worth it.

Stack also suggests trading services with friends. Offer to do tasks that you enjoy or that you were planning to do anyway.

“You could exchange gardening services for babysitting services,” Stack says. “If you like to cook, you could prepare and freeze a couple of meals and give them to a friend in exchange for wrapping your holiday gifts.”

4. Get moving.

It’s hard to make time for exercise when you have a jam-packed schedule, but it may ultimately help you get more done by boosting your energy level and ability to concentrate.

“Research shows exercise can help you to be more alert,” Brooks says. “And I’ve noticed that when I don’t exercise because I’m trying to squeeze in another half hour of writing, I don’t feel as alert.”

Samantha Harris, a lawyer who works for a nonprofit organization in Philadelphia, goes to her gym 2 or 3 mornings a week before her family wakes up. “It’s been a real boost in terms of the way I feel for the rest of the day,” she says. “I feel like my head is clearer and I’ve had a little time to myself.”

5. Remember that a little relaxation goes a long way.

Don’t assume that you need to make big changes to bring more balance to your life. Brooks recommends setting realistic goals, like leaving the office earlier 1 night per week.

“Slowly build more activities into your schedule that are important to you,” he says. “Maybe you can start by spending an hour a week on your hobby of carpentry, or planning a weekend getaway with your spouse once a year.”

Even during a hectic day, you can take 10 or 15 minutes to do something that will recharge your batteries. “Take a bath, read a trashy novel, go for a walk, or listen to music,” Stack says. “You have to make a little time for the things that ignite your joy.”

The long and short of it – have a schedule and use it!  Be sure to plan out your downtime so it has a purpose and you are having fun!  Here at the Distinctive Edge, we believe in working hard and playing hard. We teach you how to plan and schedule and encourage family time.

http://www.thedistinctive.org

What a great article – thanks to: http://www.webmd.com/health-insurance/protect-health-13/balance-life?page=2

One thing I’ve learned from the great CEOs and senior leaders I get to work with is this: They learn and grow from every experience they have—good or bad.

I reached out to five senior leaders I respect to find out what they learned from their first jobs. Some fun stuff:

Scott O’Neil, CEO, Philadelphia 76ers and New Jersey Devils

I was digging pools in 1984 for Ted’s Pools. It was the summer I turned 14. It was my first real job. I was working 50 hours a week and getting paid—is there anything more real than that?

Lessons:

  1. There is no substitute for hard work. It matters and there isn’t a successful person I have met since who isn’t in the top one percent for work ethic and drive. They give more than an honest day’s work for their pay.
  2. Be proactive. It’s still true today. If you sit and wait you’ve already lost. If you do what your told, you are falling behind. Get up, take action, and move the business forward.
  3. Customers matter most. It’s tough to run a business without customers, but howmatters too. The best way to drive a business is to have your best customers drive it for you.

Kent Taylor, Founder and CEO, Texas Roadhouse

My first job was as a busboy at Captain’s Quarter’s, a seafood restaurant on the Ohio River in Louisville. I was 15, and it was my introduction to the foodservice industry. I’ve remained in foodservice for 42 years. The owner, Dottie Mahon, influenced me tremendously about how to create a company culture of caring.

Lessons:

  1. You positively impact your employees by treating them with respect.
  2. If you treat guests well, it will lead to return visits.
  3. The importance of clean restrooms (Captain’s Quarters had the cleanest bathrooms in the city)!

Doria Camaraza, Senior VP and General Manager, American Express World Service Center

My first real job was as advertising director of a small trade magazine, part of a national publishing company. I learned so much from my leader at the time.

Lessons:

  1. Be kind. Mom had already instilled that in us, but I was able to experience how in a work environment it goes a long way in getting things done.
  2. Count to 10. Taking the time to think something through, even if it’s just for 10 seconds, sometimes allows you to consider a colleague’s point of view, which can lead to a better conclusion.
  3. Ensure your words and actions are consistent. In other words, have integrity.

Mark Servodidio, Executive VP, Franchise and Corporate Services, Avis Europe, Middle East & Africa (EMEA)

My first real job was at the Bronx Psychiatric Center in New York. It was real because I lived away from home, got paid, and had to manage my budget. My role was to assist patients in assimilating back into society after transitioning from the main institution.

Lessons:

  1. Be personally responsible. Every decision has an implication, for instance if you aren’t on time for work, you let down people who are counting on you.
  2. Make informed decisions and stand by them. I needed to know whether a patient was ready for assimilation back to society or not. People may not be happy or agree with your decision, but if you have the facts and knowledge you need to stick with your decision.
  3. Little actions make a big difference. A note of encouragement, staying late to help a co-worker, offering a word of encouragement to a team member (or patient) who’s having a tough time. I remember having a patient ready for release but I wanted to make sure so I took him shopping for clothes and food to increase his chances of success. Your team members (or customers) remember the little things you do for them and it creates a loyalty that money cannot buy.

Bill Manning, President, Real Salt Lake (MLS Soccer Club)


My first real job was as a window cleaner in Rockefeller Center in Manhattan. An old soccer coach of mine was the supervisor. This was the mid ‘80s and we were getting paid $12.50 an hour, so for a summer job the pay was great.

Lessons:

  1. You’ve got to show up. Woody Allen said 80 percent of life is showing up. If you don’t, you don’t get paid. For a college kid to be in Manhattan at 5 a.m. every morning was not easy, so finding the commitment to sleep properly so I could function at work became a learning lesson. I’ve found during my career that you need to “put” yourself in positions to succeed.
  2. Be humble. Window cleaning is not exactly glamorous, especially in the heart of a white collar business area. For nearly everyone else at National Cleaning, this was their livelihood, and I was always impressed with the level of pride most took in their jobs. But I found we were not usually treated with respect from the people in the offices. I vowed I would never act “that way.” Nothing irks me more than when I see executives in powerful positions belittling others just because of their job function.
  3. Fit in. Here I was a young kid, hired directly by the supervisor. I remember my first month or so on the job most of the window cleaners were leery of me as if I was a spy. Having been a teammate in sports I understood this type of mentality and after time when they found out I wasn’t snitching or going back to the boss, I eventually earned their trust and acceptance. This made my experience there so much better. Just like those summers, the ability to work well across a company has served me well during my career.

These are some of my business heroes. I love what they’ve shared—from fitting in to treating customer and co-workers with respect to keeping the bathrooms clean. I’d love to hear what you learned from your first real job.

***

Photos from top: The PNG Scotts/Flickr, Matthew Staver/Bloomberg, John Moore/Getty Images, Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg, Gene Sweeney Jr via Getty Images Sport.
What a great article from Chester Elton:  http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20131029195656-39785422-15-first-job-lessons-from-some-amazing-senior-leaders